* indicates monthly or quarterly data series

GDP per hour worked in current USD, PPP adjusted, 2022:

The average for 2022 based on 37 countries was 75 USD per hour worked. The highest value was in Ireland: 162.5 USD per hour worked and the lowest value was in Colombia: 20.5 USD per hour worked. The indicator is available from 1970 to 2022. Below is a chart for all countries where data are available.

Measure: USD per hour worked; Source: OECD
Select indicator
* indicates monthly or quarterly data series


Countries Productivity, current USD, 2022 Global rank Available data
Ireland 162.5 1 1970 - 2022
Norway 161.8 2 1970 - 2022
Luxembourg 130.7 3 1970 - 2022
Denmark 104.2 4 1970 - 2022
Switzerland 100.5 5 1970 - 2022
Belgium 100 6 1970 - 2022
Sweden 95.6 7 1970 - 2022
Austria 95.1 8 1995 - 2022
Netherlands 92.3 9 1970 - 2022
USA 91.5 10 1970 - 2022
Germany 90.9 11 1970 - 2022
Iceland 90.1 12 1970 - 2022
France 86.7 13 1970 - 2022
Finland 84.8 14 1970 - 2022
Australia 78.9 15 1970 - 2022
UK 76.7 16 1970 - 2022
Italy 74 17 1970 - 2022
Canada 71.9 18 1970 - 2022
Spain 68.8 19 1970 - 2022
Slovenia 62.1 20 1995 - 2022
Turkey 61.3 21 1970 - 2022
Lithuania 61.2 22 1995 - 2022
Israel 58.5 23 1981 - 2022
Latvia 57.9 24 1995 - 2022
Czechia 57.2 25 1993 - 2022
Slovakia 56.6 26 1995 - 2022
Portugal 56.2 27 1970 - 2022
Poland 56 28 1993 - 2022
Estonia 54.9 29 2000 - 2022
New Zealand 54.4 30 1970 - 2022
Japan 53.4 31 1970 - 2022
Hungary 51.8 32 1991 - 2022
South Korea 50.1 33 2011 - 2022
Greece 44.8 34 1983 - 2022
Chile 35.5 35 1986 - 2022
Mexico 24 36 1991 - 2022
Colombia 20.5 37 1975 - 2022



Definition: GDP per hour worked expressed in current USD. The level of GDP is adjusted in terms of Purchasing Power Parity to reflect price differences across countries.
What explains differences in productivity across countries

The volume of goods and services produced by an hour of work is determined largely by these three factors: 1) The available physical capital including advanced machinery as more abundant capital increases the amount a worker can produce during a given time interval; 2) The level of human capital of the labor force including education and experience with more human capital contributing to higher productivity; and 3) How effectively work is organized on the individual, firm, and social levels.

The third factor depends on the strength of rule of law and institutions in a country as well as on social norms and customs including the level of social trust. These societal characteristics are difficult to enhance over short periods of time and therefore differences in productivity levels across countries are relatively persistent. Even if machinery becomes more abundant and people get more educated, productivity may not increase rapidly if productive processes remain ineffectively organized.

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